Running Rails applications using Nginx with Passenger on Ubuntu Server

If you’re planning to run Rails applications on Nginx using Phusion Passenger, and do it on Ubuntu Linux, here’s what needs to be done.

Even though there’s Ubuntu nginx package available (which works perfectly when you’re running PHP apps using FCGI), if you want to take into use Phusion Passenger, you’ll need to recompile Nginx from sources.

Instructions below were verified on Ubuntu 10.04 (Lucid Lynx) Server Edition.

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Setting up your own git server on Ubuntu

This will create a new user ‘gitosis’ and prepare a structure for repositories in /srv/gitosis. Now let’s initialize a gitosis-admin repo – it is used for managing repositories and access

Of course there’s always an option to use github. And if you’re working on an open source project, or want to concentrate on coding and not system administration, github is a lot better option than setting up and managing your own git server (I’ve been so impressed by @defunkt‘s presentation on #frozenrails, that started recommending github to everyone 🙂 But if you already pay for a virtual machine somewhere (like Linode), then setting up your own git server might be a viable option, especially that it is sooo easy.

The following instructions have been verified on Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx, but should work at least on Ubuntu 9.04 and 9.10 just as well.

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What’s new in Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty Jakalope

Jaunty Jackalope It was a fun weekend. I upgraded from Ubuntu 8.10 to 9.04 on my Lenovo T61 and installed it instead of Windows Vista on my wife’s new Dell Vostro 1510.

Both upgrade and installation on both machines went without a single hickup, which was a positive surprise after my last experience with Ubuntu upgrade.

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Upgrading to Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron or “Ubuntu sucks… get a Mac”

I should admit – I shamelessly borrowed part of the title for this post from Tyler.
I had exactly same feeling after upgrading from Ubuntu 7.10 to 8.04.

I’ve been meaning to write about this upgrade for almost two months now. Right after Ubuntu 8.04 was released I upgraded two of my laptops from Ubuntu 7.10 to 8.04. I know, I know, never download software on the release date, wait for a couple of months before all major bugs are fixed and it starts working somehow. But anyway…

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Sampo bank software upgrade, Ubuntu and beta culture

Even if you are not Sampo bank’s customer, but live in Finland, you have most probably heard by now about continuous problems Sampo had with their web-bank system.

When Sampo launched the new system this Easter, they took into use Java-based authentication system. Of course it didn’t work in my Ubuntu 7.10, but after removing Open JDK and installing latest Sun JDK it started functioning again – at least log in worked. This Java solution raised a lot of concerns in internet community.

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Moving /home to its own partition

Ubuntu - Disk Usage AnalyzerAfter upgrading Ubuntu to 8.04 I decided it would be a good idea to finally move /home folder to a separate partition. It makes it much easier to make backups and reinstall operating system if all data/configurations are safely stored on their own partition.

Without installing additional hard drive (which would be impractical for laptop user anyway) the only source for extra space was Vista partition. Vista comes preinstalled with most modern laptops, but there’s no need for it to exist taking up to 40Gb of hard drive space, when Ubuntu is the primary OS.

WARNING: Before executing any of the belowmentioned steps, it is highly recommended to make a full backup of your data.
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